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Food For Thought

By | Post

(CDM Blog) Food For Thought

The Cockeyed Optimist

Today is the dawn of a new day, a renew of optimism. I can breath a little.

For about ten years, I have headed a marketing and advertising agency. It sounds exciting, but in truth, it can be mundane. It can also be downright disheartening because it is really very little in the profession gives one encouragement. We're an agency where "always...or maybe, today," prevails.

In running an agency, one of the most questionable, or depressing aspects is that old adage of a good client being very hard to find. Sometimes I think he may be walking the streets in the guise of homeless people. You know type? That's a person walks up to you, demands a few dollars to gauge your reaction. It's either Jesus, or an undercover millionaire looking for a marketing company. The inability to tell the difference of in the to, this what creates problems.

Advertising is like any other industry. We want to grow. We want to prosper. We want the guy in the homeless who to bless us with a fat contract. Of course, I'm being facetious. But, this article is entitled “The Cockeyed Optimist,” because it seems I’ve some major serendipity of late.

David Ogilvy advocated that a leader must be willing to delegate, and indeed give up certain aspects of the business to someone a bit more enthusiastic, mercurial, and insightful. In times past these people tend to be frightening because the expectations that they were really gunning for your job. I'm optimistic for good reason.

I started looking for someone to assist me in the day-to-day running of my agency. I discovered a remarkable woman who has exceeded my expectations, a moment of doubt I had the first second. The second ‘second’ allayed my fears because he spoke so articulately and with insight.

What this simply means is that I can breathe easier. It's good to have someone alongside you that is really an equal. It's not surprising that this gifted young woman has begun the see the agency as her own and helped to take it in the direction that it should be in. If that means that my view is askew, it means that progress has finally visited us.

Now, I need to hire a cute salesman to go shakedown a couple of homeless people. I'm willing to bet that the three dudes occupying the tent along San Fernando Road are in fact the former heads of the three largest brokerage firms and have decided to start new companies, incognito.

Bernard Alexander McNealy

Food For Thought: An Agency Life

By | Post

An advertising agency is one of life’s peculiar things. Some outfits overflow with optimism and soar to stratospheric, fiscal heights.  Others languish in a sea of struggle – year after year — customers are few and far between. The thought of closing of shop is always one breath away. The process goes this way: “I love being creative, but I ain’t got nothing to create.” The last part is a surefire path to rage, or being eternally pissed off. Agency life should be one where the highest creative achievement is realized. In truth, it is an existence where a creative director is beset by WTF moments.

 

I read recently that advertising agencies are considered by members of the public to be less trustworthy than used car salesmen. But hey! We are still one level above politicians…but that’s another story.

 

Face it, we hawk products like carnival barkers. We promise to lead you to the woman with a third breast – only to reveal it is only an extra roll of fat hanging from her chin. We are asked to speak the truth, and we should. When I sit down with a new client, I tell them I feel obligated to always tell them the truth. (I may unfold it in segments over a few days, but it will be the truth.) New clients plead to know your speculative prognostication regarding how their products will perform after they hire you.

End Part 1

Clients want to know whether they have exhausted their capital with a group of consumers, a how impactful it will be on their revenue. They want the truth. The client is saying regardless of the forecast of product performance, they can handle it. We shouldn’t be reluctant to engage in that dialogue. We’re being paid for our expertise and insight. The honest ad agency will tell them if their perceptions are real or imagined. There is an abiding truth – when you think you’ve tapped out, find new markets.

 

CDM clients have mostly been small and mid-sized businesses. You know – bookstores –insurance agencies — retail stores, car dealerships, restaurants, spas, computer stores and even software companies. In other words, Mom and Pop of all ethnic gradations. Small business – the engine of the American economic machine. Those are the people who built their business from nothing. Despite their courage in stepping forward to get a hand up, there is a lot of uncertainty among them. It affects business because it causes reluctance to commit to paying an agency to help them to market their company. This isn’t advanced insight into anything. It is the truth.

 

Why is it that as we go through WTF in the aftermath of the 2016 Presidential election, small agencies will continue to deal with customers and use effective strategies to market products. Sometimes, we use a combination of blended marketing tactics with public relations.  It’s advertising because the goal is to grow sales.

 

Agency life has taught me that no matter what the circumstances may be, there is one truth. The customer needs our ability to navigate their issues. To me, this is the fuel that allows me to breathe and be good at what I do.  

 

Bernard Alexander McNealy, President/Creative Director

Food For Thought: The Creative Aspect

By | Post

I remember having a class in college whose primary textbook was entitled: “Why Man Creates.” What stood out were psychological and social assessments, with spiritual overtones explaining that a person must be creative for the survival of the psyche. This resonated with me. The textbook said nothing about being creative for its own sakeor, being inventive to make money. The thrust was that they creative personality within a person shouldn’t be stifled.

 

If anything, you are your own cheerleader. When at a public interest law office, I wrote four instructional books. They weren’t very long, but explained how one could go about representing themselves in Social Security disability matters, unemployment insurance, license hearings.), handling a divorce without an attorney, the nuances of proving discrimination and sexual harassment, and one of the subject. In truth, I’d forgotten them until I sat down to write this essay.

 

How they play into the creative aspect of the person, and the imperativeness one must have, is rather basic. As someone once told me when I was interviewed for a potentially lucrative position at a law firm, “No one else will toot your horn for you.” Simply put, it’s best just to speak on the things that go into your creative makeup. Those pamphlets were a prime example, but I glossed over it. The people interviewing me told me they were aware of by accomplishments. That I didn’t speak to what I’ve done, was false humility. I didn’t get the job but, learned a valuable lesson.

 

Law school taught me to develop ethics. Seriously. Later, business told me I needed to make money to support my family. Sometimes the two of them clash. It does not mean one must be a self-consumed moneygrubbing SOB, but it was false humility got in the way, it had to be set aside.

 

This may surprise some. When you are in business, the prime motive is to do what is necessary to fill its purpose – money comes with the territory. That’s the trumpet sound on the horizon — I have talent for marketing and I must be paid if you decide to hire me. Having the opposite attitude, cause me to transition from being a mediator.

 

Now, this brings me to working for or operating a creative agency. It is false humility to apologize for being able to use your imagination to idealize how a brand will benefit targeted consumers. I interview people that I want to put on staff who suffer from blushing and bashfulness. They have the refrain: “I just want to learn.” There is a bigger challenge than that, contribute something to the effort to promote a client. If you can’t, or feel that it’s a sin for you to use your gift of dreams and ideation, the creative arts are not for you. I have told clients that I respect their ideas, but from where I sit, what I offer is the best. In other words, listen and learn. Let me do my thing. If I’m going too far afield, let’s discuss it because I’m not serving you properly.

 

I can’t make apologies for believing people that work for agencies should have a common purpose – create the best advertising and calculate it to sell a client’s product. Clients aren’t impressed with how well a creative can turn a phrase, or design out of this world graphics. It is and always been the bottom line. ‘How much money am I making?’ Most advertising graduates don’t know what I’m talking about.

 

People believe that their independence must be disruptive of the agency itself. So, this type of baloney and infighting wounds both the psyche and work product. Everybody suffers. A talented staff helps an organization grow, but its compassion that rules the day. If we want to be ahead of the next agency – we will be smarter, leaner and be purposeful.

 

I will start the long interviewing process for Spring. I expect many will say their book of work is fine. Careful, I am setting real parameters now. Understand though what will be asked is that you must bring ideas to the fore that is better than the stuff that passes for “advertising.”

 

Most of it is crap. Everybody knows it.

Food For Thought: Too Much Information – Not Enough Time

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By now, anyone that has read my blogs knows that I am the president of a small advertising agency. We’re an agency because we do with agencies do – assist clients by offering marketing services, and by generating adverts. Okay. Simple enough, but did you know that it’s difficult? Sometimes it’s even thankless and definitely can be money draining.

Let me reveal a masochistic tendency about my relationship to advertising and its pitfalls: I like it.

However, it’s lonely at the top. I’m supposed to know everything. But, I’ve discovered in the quest to know everything, there’s not enough time to discover and absorb the information.  This morning I attended a meeting on integrating CRM and marketing automation. It was quite a discussion. It was definitely not ‘old school’. Tomorrow, I’m going to learn more about data and analytics. The other day, someone sat in my office and droned on about programmatic methods for media buying. That meeting left me cross-eyed, and, this morning my left eye became my right eye and vice versa.

There is a project sitting on my desk that needs commentary, possibly requiring me to analyze why the graphics are off, and why the copywriting inconsistent. Yep. Helping to straighten out the inconsistencies of this advertising issue should be my element, but this other 21st-century digital modernist stuff keeps getting in the way.

What I’m learning is that it’s almost impossible for one person to take on the roles we small agency operators often have. What often suffers is that in the struggle to keep up, customer needs are affected negatively. Certainly, it’s unintentional. It also isn’t because we can’t let go and delegate because is often no one to delegate to. The hope is to incorporate a system and bring in individuals that can handle the nuances and intricacies required of marketing specialists, and sales people. It’s great being top management, but I want the end product that we produce to improve massively because our clients deserve it.

Running an agency has become more complex than before simply because as the tools of delivering our services improve, so does the level of difficulty to be good increase. When I got started in marketing and advertising, very seldom did we give the Internet a thought except to do basic research. The heavy stuff was done by some nerd steeped in statistics and research, and no one really cared how they learned it. I’m not doing myself a service by lagging behind in learning of, and discovering the usage of online sales technology and tools. But, I’m not a sales director but a guy that writes ads for other businesses.

It’s not so much a complaint but recognition that this profession is a difficult one to master. It’s easy to be mediocre. The standards that we set for ourselves should be higher than mediocrity. Clients place trust in us as well as pay for our services. As the remainder of the day closes, I’ll probably sketch out how all of this headache-inducing “stuff,” can help me develop my vision of a company that is proficient, nimble and capable of doing knockout work.

Some clients understand.

A few weeks ago, I spoke to a former client that told me of the plenteous marketing and advertising needs of his startup. He was considering hiring a large agency in Los Angeles.  After giving him an assessment of their capabilities, they quoted a retainer that made him choke. Still, he went to their offices and was given a brief tour and noticed they had departments committed to doing the very thing I’m trying to come up to speed too.

“These people are cold. When you handled a project for me, your staff treated me well,” he said.

I replied: “It’s just the Golden Rule. Honestly, that other agency’s a better fit.  It may be in your best interest to go with them.”

“Remember, if they’re not accessible, I doubt if they’re working for me. Never take the personal touch out of what you do.” He said, but took my advice.

After encouraging me, he gave an analogy of a small agency taking on a big formidable one. He talked about a boxing match between Sugar Ray Leonard and Mike Tyson. In his story, Ray knocked Iron Mike out. That analogy is reflective of reality because we try to compete against competitors that have five floors of creatives to undertake a project and know the modern digital “stuff.” 

That’s a great analogy, but if Mike tags Sugar Ray with a left hook, imagine the little guy’s headache. Maybe, learning stuff that will make me cross-eyed makes sense.

Food For Thought: Core Values

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When CDM Digital Advertising opened its doors during the ‘Great Recession,’ we soon discovered that despite the proliferation of agencies, we needed to stand out.  We are singular and make brands stand out because we are amazing story tellers.

We aren't skateboarding stoner ‘digitals,’ or, those jokers that proclaim I'm smarter than you 'because I code.’ We truly honor our clients and our philosophy is etched in four precepts.

Our Tagline: "Making Your Brand Memorable."

Our Mission: To tell a client’s story from the widest tapestry of imagination.

Our Philosophy: We have purpose: To create, succeed, and be the best.

Our Core Values: “The CDM Way.”

* We operate with integrity.

* Our agency observes and respects the dignity of others.

* We are ethical in all of our dealings.

* Be confident that our agency will fulfill its desire of “Making Your Brand Memorable.”

Perhaps addressing the idea of core values is simply one way to be meaningful as an agency. After all, an agency should have an identity -- as Ogilvy demonstrated in everything he did as titular creative head of Ogilvy and Mather. Sir John Hegarty has also admonished an agency to stand for something -- to be different and not part of the crowd.

I suppose that's a great idea when one remembers that there are 20,000 agencies -- some good -- some bad. A client doesn't really know until they've had a chance to interact with the agency -- CDM has discovered that more than we first have to get invited to offer our services. It does a disservice to what we claim to be if we haven't shown how good we are at what CDM does.

It's not easy because agencies do not promote themselves as one might think --part of it is because they haven't a clue. Many people, especially consumer confuse a tagline for the substance of a brand. In introducing the CDM Way, we have decided that our small agency is just as professional, if not more so than any other agency. If a staff member decides that how we work is a joke -- then they are in the wrong place.

Food For Thought: Why We Don’t Do Porn — A Second Look

By | Advertising, Branding, Digital Advertising

Back in 2011, I wrote a blog post called: “Why We Don’t Do Porn”. It is now 2016, and while I am not reassessing my moral positioning on a given matter, or practicing relativism, I am looking at business realities. Then and now, as the agency president/owner, I am the titular head of new business and responsible for bringing in revenue for a small advertising agency. Quite honestly, the competition has an edge – pragmatism.

I say pragmatism because when one takes an unequivocal stance as to what they will and will not do, they are not taking into consideration the fact that the world is not made of black and white, but is a series of gray gradations. It determines our moral precepts and presumptions. A stance based on ‘moral’ grounds is admirable. Echoing Dr. Martin Luther King and several others, a person that this does not stand for something, will fall for anything. Here is the problem. It is also painting one’s self into a corner.

By the very nature of owning a business, I am a capitalist. In most respects I am laissez-faire. I believe too much government regulation is nothing more than interference with what I’m doing for my family. Still, I am an advocate of fair and equal wages irrespective of gender, and endeavor to pay them. I hope most businesses understand child labor, anti-discrimination laws, and workplace safety are the unquestioned law of the land. If you resist them, you’re an idiot.

The workplace should be as comfortable, and welcoming as a person’s home. Feeling this way doesn’t make me nobler than anyone else. It’s a recognition common sense should be a constant presence in all that we do.

When I wrote that blog post in 2011, it reflected my feelings. I haven’t necessarily changed, but as I said I’m a capitalist, my business is supposed to make money. Our society has changed and every evolves. America has become a place I no longer recognize. The marijuana business has become a growth industry. What should my stance be – ignore it? That’s one approach. But for an agency that may mean not pursuing a potentially profitable account.

And, what about e- cigarettes -- should I just pursue pitching those companies that claim to only use herbal products? What about the pharmaceutical industry? What if a pro-abortion group wanted to promote an event related to women health issues? Should I let my pro-life stance interfere with providing advertising or some form of promotional marketing for them? And what about politicians? Some do lie -- few tell the truth -- but will if the gun is aimed between the eyes. I have to question whether or not I should help promote one of them.

Here’s my honest opinion. We live in a place called the “Big Picture.” That is simply defining ourselves as moral beings that recognize that there is a greater good and a higher power. Universal morality comes knowing these things. Still, if presented with something that is unpopular or controversial, payroll considerations will factor in the decision. Does that mean CDM Digital Advertising will provide marketing for PornHub, ‘adult’ products  or a girlie magazine? I can only say that caring about the whole human being will factor into it. If a product or organization is hell-bent on degrading people, to them I say, try the creative outfit up the block.

Bernard Alexander McNealy, President

CDM Digital Advertising

Food for Thought: When Staff Leaves, It’s Personal

By | Advertising, Branding, Digital Advertising

Every person that owns a small business will face staff attrition at some point. When it happens, how do you react? If they were problematic folks, the inclination is to applaud. That is more knee-jerk anything else because their departure may have greater significance — perhaps it’s a warning sign. So, the question becomes: How do you keep your staff together? The short answer is that you cannot. Moreover, when people leave, ownership should take it personal because there is a lesson to be learned.ouchimages

Advertising and marketing are revolving doors, especially when one is dealing with so-called creatives. No matter what catalyst drives a person out the door, if the causal factors are not addressed, the company will become deader than Mo Green.

My agency has always had a small staff. We function based on the needs of our clients, assigning at least three people to an account. Obviously, larger agencies can throw more people on an account because they have the people. That makes sense.

Small staff grows with freelancers, part-timers and interns increasing its size temporarily to accomplish what needs to be done. The agency thus operates as a squad rather than battalion. Either way, creative quality and the integrity of the agency’s culture has to be paramount.

Across the board, almost every industry (including advertising) faces a debate regarding wages, pay structure, and benefits. It has to be sufficient for one to support their family. True, a well-run agency can make a lot of money, but conversely poorly run agency can run itself into the ground. That’s why staff attrition has to be taken seriously.

In the past, I failed to have an exit interview with each person that left my employ. I discovered later that a person left not necessarily for higher wages, but because their new employer promises them greater creative responsibility. In other words, they wanted to do something of real value. Exit interviews also allows you to discover that conflict between staff members may be the primary causal factor in leaving.

Business owners do a disservice to themselves if they are clueless as to what causes the run to the front door. I know because I have been there, and it’s easy to get mired in the quicksand.

I have made a choice to change our business model, transitioning from traditional to digital. Let me make two confessions:

1) Digital platforms are only tools — they are not the world unto themselves. It is complex because it is technology. You want the clients to embrace your new and improved delivery of services. But, your agency wasn’t hired to dazzle anyone. It was hired to improve their sales;

2) The second thing is this. You have a style, a level of and delivery of competent creativeness. No matter what you call it, its advertising, reduced to its most effective forms. I miss that.

Let me share my “teachable moment,” where the veil of ignorance fell from my face — it happened in a two week span. I fired an account executive for gross job dereliction and dishonesty. A day later, an executive staff member left without courtesy of a letter of resignation. It turns out, she wasn’t very well liked, but she was valuable to me. As the guy in charge, I should’ve had my hand on the pulse of my staff. I inhaled but within a week, two other people resigned as I exhaled.

Their reasons were sound and logical: creative opportunities; more money, better benefits. Counter offers were proposed, but in the end, they left.

Valuable people had gone out the door, and clearly I missed warning signs. Friday of the same week saw one more departure – sound reasons I thought. That weekend, another letter of resignation came in my e-mail. I e-mailed my Coordinator of Strategy. “We’ll rally the troops. Let’s go through those resumes — don’t worry.” Her reasoning was sound and made sense. After talking to her, I watched the Sopranos and got a nagging feeling ‘Eddie Big Nose’ was gunning for me.

Monday I poured over resumes and found several good candidates to interview. The Coordinator of Strategy came in, tearful with her letter of resignation. Another opportunity came along over the weekend. Blam! Blam! Blam! “Eddie Big Nose” got me.

I learned a lot as I lay figuratively bleeding. Maybe this will help someone similarly situated.

  1. Meet regularly with the entire staff to keep them abreast with company happenings. Send a company e-mail in case something or someone was left out;
  2. Meet with employees likely to exercise free agency. There are subtle hints. There may be something that can be done – adjustments perhaps can made to keep them. If you promise to rectify a concern, be sincere and execute it as promised. Don’t bullshit.
  3. Develop a sense of family. If affordable, have either a company picnic, or regular lunches. It is the little things that count;
  4. Assign meaningful duties not within the job description;
  5. Allow cross-training. Employee ‘A’ may be better suited for another position. Perhaps they are too reserved to ask about it, but you’re meeting them halfway;
  6. Don’t play favorites. This is very difficult because some people are more personable than others are. A ‘q’ factor causes us to gravitate to them. That creates discord;
  7. Strive to raise pay above cost-of-living indexes, and certainly keep up with industry standards;
  8. Improve your benefit package, and pay bonuses:
  9. Acknowledge your employees because they are the linchpin of the business.

In a previous incarnation of my business, staff broke bread at lunches, and we kept up with pay standards. Even though it strained our budget, bonuses were paid around Christmas. I’m not saying that this made me the perfect employer, no one is. But as a boss it’s your choice to cultivate a sense of family or became overly corporate.

Your business will function better in unity. Sometimes, loyalty keeps a person wedded to a job because of some type of intangibility.

I’m not too cynical or idealistic to want an old fashion company in our fast paced culture.

Bernard A. McNealy, President

CDM Digital Advertising

Agency Culture: “The CDM Way.”

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The idea of agency culture is powerful. Culture can be defined several ways. It could be a culture based on intimidation, paranoia, or political infighting. Culture can also be nurtured trust, from that, productivity develops. Ideally, culture within the company goes a long way to allowing those things to come to fruition that make us fulfilled in what we’re doing.Way-to-a-Rainy-Night

Studying other agencies have given me a perspective. At one time, culture embodied around company social interaction (crazy parties like they used to have before sexual harassment litigation, or dram shop lawsuits).  When that stuff waned, agencies took on a casual style – torn clothing, sandals – disheveled chic — shorts — bowling alleys – ping pong tables and so on.

Is that culture, or comfort and playtime? I don’t know, but its sounds like recess. How many big ideas come from playing ping pong? How ticked off is a graphic designer buried with her nose in work while listening to guys drinking beer and shooting the crap about shagging girls?

Whatever form it is, culture should be positive.  Everyone in an agency should embrace it because company culture is simply taking care of business the right way. Agency culture does not start with recess on the client’s time, but truly exists if the agency functions with cohesion.

Culture, or projected positiveness should be voiced by every member of the team. Interns, middle and senior management included. Everyone. Each is an ambassador of an agency, and should understand the shop’s motives and goals.

When asked, they should be able to enunciate it. It doesn’t require a lot of words, but whether or not we provide good work is demonstrated by the actual product. If it is memorable advertising, or the brand is made memorable by our work, it’s also evident, it is consequential by how we do things.

In the past I’ve written that I’m from the city of Boston. The NFL Patriots Football Team have a special place in my heart. I love the way that team operates – I love their culture. Our agency has a culture called the “CDM Way,” patterned on the “Patriot Way.” We’re gaining structure and a desire to be exceptional.

Here’s what the “Patriot Way” is: Cohesion. It starts with Mr. Kraft, to Coach Bellichek, to the players and staff. Individuality is not discarded, but loyalty and purpose are stressed to attain a goal: The championship. If one player or a group of them become susceptible to injury and cannot play, they are replaced by players who believe that they can get the job done. That is the Patriot Way. “Do Your Job–” Coach Bellichek exhorts.

The CDM Way is to do good work that enables a client’s products to sell. Consistency must be good year after year. We developed and mentored an excellent art director at CDM, but for whatever reason she left. She was also associate creative director, making her within a small percentage of female creative directors in the United States (that was regardless of agency size. Perhaps she did not understand or appreciate it.) She left with her work undone and it had the effect of an injury on the rest of us.

Her replacement was able to adapt her graphic styles to our style – the CDM Way. The work product is always supposed to stand for excellence, integrity and be respected for the workmanship. The same held true of copywriters. When a copywriter left, another replaced him.

When culture is real, the true objectives of an agency speak loudly. Quite honestly, when it is not, presentations a much harder, and RFP responses seem to be circular arguments. Whoever we are is represented by what we claim. That is not bragging, it is to simply state what we can provide that’s different than other agencies.

We are many things: a work in progress, a ‘dark horse’ unknown group in a nondescript building, but since we are developing, what we are today, will be tomorrow’s memory. We can’t be intimidated by relative smallness of staff. The Patriots didn’t capture a Superbowl until they had an earth shattering change in thinking. Prior to that, the team had been good, but the infusion of the culture of winners birthed a dynasty. History speaks to that.

I’m confident history will speak to the consistency of the CDM Way and its efforts to make a client’s brand memorable. That can only occur unless our agency culture is that of winners and believers.

Bernard Alexander McNealy

The Reason We Decided to Change Locations

By | Business

S eparated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia. It is a paradisematic country, in which roasted parts of sentences fly into your mouth. Even the all-powerful Pointing has no control about the blind texts it is an almost unorthographic life One day however a small line of blind text by the name of Lorem Ipsum decided to leave for the far World of Grammar. The Big Oxmox advised her not to do so, because there were thousands of bad Commas, wild Question Marks and devious Semikoli, but the Little Blind Text didn’t listen. She packed her seven versalia, put her initial into the belt and made herself on the way. l using her.Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia.

But nothing the copy said could convince her

and so it didn’t take long until a few insidious

Copy Writers ambushed her

The Big Oxmox advised her not to do so, because there were thousands of bad Commas, wild Question Marks and devious Semikoli, but the Little Blind Text didn’t listen. She packed her seven versalia, put her initial into the belt and made herself on the way. When she reached the first hills of the Italic Mountains, she had a last view back on the skyline of her hometown Bookmarksgrove, the headline of Alphabet Village and the subline of her own road, the Line Lane. Pityful a rethoric question ran over her cheek, then she continued her way. On her way she met a copy.

Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia. It is a paradisematic country, in which roasted parts of sentences fly into your mouth. Even the all-powerful Pointing has no control about the blind texts it is an almost unorthographic life One day however a small line of blind text by the name of Lorem Ipsum decided to leave for the far World of Grammar. The Big Oxmox advised her not to do so, because there were thousands of bad Commas, wild Question Marks and devious Semikoli, but the Little Blind Text didn’t listen. She packed her seven versalia, put her initial into the belt and made herself on the way. l using her.Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia.

A New Beginning Awaits

By | Business

Even the all-powerful Pointing has no control over the situation.

Even the all-powerful Pointing has no control about the blind texts it is an almost unorthographic life One day however a small line of blind text by the name of Lorem Ipsum decided to leave for the far World of Grammar. The Big Oxmox advised her not to do so, because there were thousands of bad Commas, wild Question Marks and devious Semikoli, but the Little Blind Text didn’t listen.

She packed her seven versalia, put her initial into the belt and made herself on the way. l using her.Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia.

S eparated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia. It is a paradisematic country, in which roasted parts of sentences fly into your mouth. Even the all-powerful Pointing has no control about the blind texts it is an almost unorthographic life One day however a small line of blind text by the name of Lorem Ipsum decided to leave for the far World of Grammar. The Big Oxmox advised her not to do so, because there were thousands of bad Commas, wild Question Marks and devious Semikoli, but the Little Blind Text didn’t listen. She packed her seven versalia, put her initial into the belt and made herself on the way.

l using her.Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia.

Sentences fly into your mouth.

far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia.

Her hometown Bookmarksgrove.

far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia.

And if she hasn’t been rewritten, then they are still using her. Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts.

Blind Text

Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia. It is a paradisematic country, in which roasted parts of sentences fly into your mouth. Even the all-powerful Pointing has no control about the blind texts it is an almost unorthographic life One day however a small line of blind text by the name of Lorem Ipsum decided to leave for the far World of Grammar. The Big Oxmox advised her not to do so, because there were thousands of bad Commas, wild Question Marks and devious Semikoli, but the Little Blind Text didn’t listen.

She packed her seven versalia, put her initial into the belt and made herself on the way. l using her.Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia.

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